Mini-Me Monday: The King of Cheese

This one was written ten years ago, way back in middle school! I think Mini Maria was a little cheesy… 😉

The King of Cheese by Maria Ferguson

This is a story about the King of Cheese. That’s why it is entitled “The King of Cheese.”  If it wasn’t about the King of Cheese, I might have called it “Unicorn Pastures” or “A Day at School.”  However, this story is about a king, a mouse, who rules over cheese (quite literally, in fact).

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Mini-Me Monday: The Capsule

The Capsule

Written circa 2006.

One morning, Marie Kaline woke up to her mother shaking her.  “Marie! Wake up! Mitchell disappeared last night!”  Mitchell was their next door neighbor.   It was only eight o’clock in the morning and already the day was disastrous.  Marie gasped.  “What happened?” she asked. “Do you know?”  “No,” her mother replied, “but he was kidnapped…His mother just phoned.  She wants us to go to their house.  Now hurry and get dressed.” In a few minutes, Marie and Mrs. Kaline were on their way.  Mitchell’s mother met them at the door.  Her black hair, normally neat, was uncombed.  Her cheerful face was now white with worry.  Continue reading

Mini-Me Monday: The Ghost Ship

Written in 5th/6th grade, this fictional short story is a chilling tale of  unashamed info-dumps, family dynamic stereotypes, and predictable…holy mother of  Martin THAT’s the ending?!

The assignment was to write a scary story, I believe. Hyperdetailed prologue notwithstanding, there was no part of the prompt  that required us to name every single one of our extraneous secondary characters.


THE GHOST SHIP

Prologue

Pete was the sixth child in a family of seven children. The three oldest kids, Matthew, Rob, and Katie were in high school and they were much too proud of it. They were very arrogant, and they would often pick on their younger siblings. The only one of his siblings that was actually nice to him was the fourth child in the family, Mark. His younger brother Teddy looked up to him, and Mary, the fifth child in the family, was completely indifferent to his existence. They would all often make fun of him.

***

Pete had an odd birthmark on the back of his left hand. It was pale and it almost seemed to shimmer at night, but in the morning, he was hardly able to see it. Sometimes it would seem large and perfectly round, sometimes it would seem rather thin and curved, and sometimes, even late at night, he wouldn’t be able to see it at all. His older brothers teased him about it a lot, and he felt very resentful towards them. Continue reading

Readers, I need your help!

The second edition of Al(m)as is here! A heart-wrenching tale of sibling love in a broken family, Al(m)as explores the power of the imagination to overcome all obstacles.

I promise it’s a short story — less than half an hour to read, and in convenient PDF form to read on or offline on all devices. Read it by clicking the image on my blog’s right sidebar, or

READ IT RIGHT HERE: Al(m)as, 2nd edition

This project is very close to my heart and I’m looking for any and all kinds of critiques, as I mentioned when I first published it. If you read it, I’ll love you forever. If you read it AND give feedback, well, we might just have to get married or something.

Read my short story, Al(m)as!

READ MY STORY: Al(m)as


DA DA-DA-DA DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA! [insert loud, obnoxious fanfare here]

Al(m)as has arrived!

Here is a promotional blurb from my Number 1 Fan:

I was glued to the story from the start.

A simple “fairy tale” story that the brother told over and over for various reasons — i.e., comfort, helping to fall asleep, hiding from the reality of their father’s addiction — turned into a powerful reality for the little girl who will not be held down.

The end gives a sense that she will thrive in life and be a inspiration to all who meet her in her future life. In spite of a tragic occurrence, the ending of this uplifting tale creates not despair, but optimism.

That, my friends, is a good story.

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Al(m)as, Part 7

New to this story? Read Part 1.


Patrick rubbed the sweat from his brow with the back of his hand, leaving a smudge of bike grease above his right eyebrow. This was ridiculous. They had been at it for hours — the “quick” bike repair was proving to be anything but. He was opening his mouth to tell Mark he could not stay much longer when his cell phone rang. It was his father. Patrick grimaced and flipped his phone open.

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Al(m)as, Part 5

New to this story? Read Part 1.


Nellie sobbed into his shoulder. Patrick hugged her tightly, his pulse still racing as he sat on the dark play structure with his sister in his lap. “It’s okay, Nells. It’s okay. I’m here. It’s okay.” He repeated the words for seconds, minutes, hours — he didn’t know how long — until they both caught their breath.

“T-t-tell me a story?” Nellie pleaded, teeth chattering. Her brother took a deep breath and closed his eyes.

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Al(m)as, Part 4

New to this story? Read Part 1.


Patrick was lying in bed staring up at his ceiling when he realized the rain had stopped. The sun had already set, cloaking the house in dusky twilight. He stood up and cautiously emerged from his room. He had to eat sometime, and he’d better make sure Nellie had eaten, too. He crept downstairs, praying to the god he hadn’t believed in since his mother died that his father would be somewhere, anywhere else.

He wasn’t.

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